Click here for PDF Edition

2012-02-10 digital edition
ABOUT US   |   ADVERTISE   |   DEADLINES   |   PR INFO   |   SUBMIT   |   DELIVERY   |   CONTACT US  |  FEEDBACK
TODAY in the Jewish World:

Click on logo for link:



Click on logo for link:

The Jewish Press of Tampa and the Jewish Press of Pinellas County are Independently- owned biweekly Jewish community newspapers published in cooperation with and supported by the Tampa JCC & Federation and the Jewish Federation of Pinellas & Pasco Counties, respectively. Copyright © 2009-2018 The Jewish Press Group of Tampa Bay, Inc., All Rights Reserved. 


 

February 10, 2012  RSS feed
Front Page

Text: T T T

Final weekend includes Israel’s first slasher film

Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival


The Israeli movie, Rabies, Kalevet in Hebrew, is described as both scary and funny. The Israeli movie, Rabies, Kalevet in Hebrew, is described as both scary and funny. Israel’s first slasher film, Rabies, promises to take moviegoers on “an emotional rollercoaster” during the final weekend of the Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival. The festival is co-hosted by the Tampa Jewish Community Center and Pinellas County’s JCC Suncoast.

The film is also the main event for YAD Night at the Movies, Saturday, Feb. 18 at 9 p.m. at Channelside IMAX 10 in Tampa. YAD is the Young Adult Division of the Tampa Jewish Federation and is open to all young Jews in the community – singles and couples.

For those who may be hesitant to watch a horror movie, Navot Papushado, one-half of the writer/director partnership that made Rabies, sums the movie up: “It’s like an emotional roller-coaster. You’re going to be scared. You’re going to laugh and sometimes it’s going to be dramatic.”


A scene from Rabies, one of the Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival offerings on Saturday evening, Feb. 18. A scene from Rabies, one of the Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival offerings on Saturday evening, Feb. 18. The movie opens with a psychotic killer on the loose in the woods. He soon crosses paths with a couple, a ranger, a group of unsuspecting tennis players and two very interesting police officers. But the film is not what it seems and soon events spiral out of control.

Papushado, interviewed on UK’s Jewish Chronicle online (thejc.com), notes that horror films often serve as a commentary on issues within contemporary society. “We wanted to make a film that would show a particular aspect of Israel … it is a very tense country, people here have a short fuse and frequently situations escalate to violence … so we decided to make a film about violence as a disease, a dormant disease waiting to spread.”

The film premiered in the U.S. at the 2011 Tribecca Film Festival and has been shown and won prizes around the world at various festivals including ones for horror film aficionados.

Following the movie, YAD will hold an afterparty and far- fromquiet Tampa Baysilent auction in

2012 a party room at the Channelside IMAX 10 complex. To register for YAD Goes to the Movies event, including after-party and silent auction, go to www.TBJFF. org. The pre-event cost is $25 and includes movie ticket, admission to after-party (food, two drink tickets) and silent auction. Cost at the door is $30.

The Saturday night bill will begin with the very adult, funny, The Names of Love, at 7 p.m. A separate ticket is needed for this film. For more on The Names of Love, see review on Page 12.


At right, Sholem Aleichem as a young man. A new film biography of the Yiddish author will be shown in Clearwater. At right, Sholem Aleichem as a young man. A new film biography of the Yiddish author will be shown in Clearwater. Sunday finale

Closing out the film festival will be a double feature on Sunday, Feb. 19 at 3 p.m. at the Capitol Theater in downtown Clearwater. The Decision Maker, a 38-minute drama, and Sholem Aleichem: Laughing in the Darkness, a 96-minute narrative biography, will be shown.

In The Decision Maker, a fictional Israeli Prime Minister, prepares for a TV election debate. Cynical, in poor health and not doing well in opinion polls, he wanders away from staffers who are preparing him for the debate and comes across an archive room where he finds a tape that summarizes his life and career – prepared to be shown in the event of his death. Viewing this tape changes his self-perception and sets him on a new path.

Those who missed a showing of Sholem Aleichem in Tampa during its theatrical run in November can catch it this time around.

The film is a biographical documentary about the Yiddish writer who created the character Tevye. Fiddler on the Roof was adapted from his Aleichem’s Tevye stories. The musical introduced him to new generations of American Jews but also cast him as a quaint observer of a changing world.

“It’s about time that the larger mass of people outside of Yiddish aficionados understood who Sholem Aleichem was,” filmmaker Joseph Dorman said. “I think he’s been hidden from view, the real Sholem Aleichem, for years and years and years.”

Regular tickets for each of the Saturday night films and the Sunday double feature are $8 for adults; $7 for students and seniors. Go to TBJFF.com to purchase tickets or for more information.


Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Click ads below for larger version