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2011-03-25 digital edition
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The Jewish Press of Tampa and the Jewish Press of Pinellas County are Independently- owned biweekly Jewish community newspapers published in cooperation with and supported by the Tampa JCC & Federation and the Jewish Federation of Pinellas & Pasco Counties, respectively. Copyright © 2009-2019 The Jewish Press Group of Tampa Bay, Inc., All Rights Reserved. 


 

March 25, 2011  RSS feed
World News

Text: T T T

New social networking site asks users to rank words, phrases as ‘most Jewish’

WYNCOTE, PA — Judaism isn’t a game, but a new Internet game called “MostJewish” is helping to begin a vibrant conversation about what it means to be Jewish in the 21st century. It’s part of a new digital initiative launched by the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College (RCC) two months ago.

Players go to www.mostjewish.com and see four words or phrases. They click on the one that feels most Jewish to them and learn the percentage of players who chose the same term. They are invited to explain the reason for their choices; they also can discuss the game on Facebook and follow it on Twitter

The site offers a constantly updated “Top Ten list” of choices and allows players to see all comments on the choices.

In the weeks leading up to Passover, the site will feature a “holiday special” version — challenging players to choose their favorite moments from the Seder. Do they think most fondly of chocolate-covered matzah, the third cup of wine, counting pages till the meal, or falling asleep at the table? During the Passover season players can see a Top Ten list of what rings most true for people about the holiday and share stories from Pesachs past.

Over time, the game will be tailored to suit audience interests and will offer players tools to explore their connection to Judaism on deeper levels. Small groups may ultimately connect over books, social justice projects, eating meals together or in-depth conversations.


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