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2018-10-05 digital edition
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The Jewish Press of Tampa and the Jewish Press of Pinellas County are Independently- owned biweekly Jewish community newspapers published in cooperation with and supported by the Tampa JCC & Federation and the Jewish Federation of Pinellas & Pasco Counties, respectively. Copyright © 2009-2018 The Jewish Press Group of Tampa Bay, Inc., All Rights Reserved. 


 

October 5, 2018  RSS feed
Just a Nosh

Text: T T T

Just a nosh..

Complied from news wires

Trump signs law expanding hate crime protections to religious institutions

WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump enacted a law that expands hate crime protections to religious institutions.

The bill signed last Friday by Trump, Protecting Religiously Affiliated Institutions Act, was prompted in part by a series of bomb threats last year against Jewish institutions.

The American Jewish Committee on Wednesday praised the passage of the law, which had strong bipartisan backing. “This important law, which provides for new and strengthened measures to deter, as well as punish, perpetrators of attacks on religious institutions, will provide a much-needed sense of comfort and security,” said Jason Isaacson, the AJC associate executive director for policy.

Hate crimes laws enable prosecutors and law enforcement to impose enhanced penalties for existing crimes if they can show that bias was a motive.

Joseph Schocken, a businessman in Mercer Island, WA, contacted his congressman, Derek Wilmer, after a local Jewish community center got a threat. Wilmer, a Democrat, joined David Kustoff, a Jewish Republican from Tennessee, to advance the bill, and it was also advanced in the Senate by Orrin Hatch, a Republican from Utah, and Dianne Feinstein, a Jewish Democrat from California.

In June, Michael Kadar, a 19-year-old American- Israeli man, was convicted by an Israeli court of making hundreds of bomb threats to Jewish community centers and Jewish schools in the United States including Tampa, as well as to airlines. U.S. federal charges are still pending against Kadar.

NASA signs deal for lunar mission with Israel Space Agency

JERUSALEM— NASA has signed an agreement with the Israel Space Agency and the Israeli nonprofit SpaceIL to collaborate on the Jewish state’s unmanned moon mission slated to launch from Cape Canaveral next year.

The landing would culminate eight years of collaboration on the $88 million project. If it succeeds, Israel will become the fourth country to reach Earth’s rocky satellite. The spacecraft’s journey to the moon will last about two months. The Israeli craft will be the smallest to land on the moon, weighing only 1,322 pounds.

Upon its landing, the spacecraft plans to take photos and video of the landing site while also measuring the moon’s magnetic field as part of a Weizmann Institute scientific experiment.

According to the new agreement, NASA will contribute a laser retro-reflector array to aid with ground tracking and support to aid in mission communication. ISA and SpaceIL will share data with the U.S. space agency from the SpaceIL lunar magnetometer installed aboard the spacecraft.

In addition, NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter will attempt to take scientific measurements of the SpaceIL lander as it lands on the moon.

96-year-old Jewish American shares Nobel Prize in Physics

Three researchers, including a Jewish American, won the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics for inventions in the field of laser physics. Arthur Ashkin, who retired after 40 years from Bell Labs in New Jersey in 1992, but remains active in his home laboratory, at 96 is the oldest ever Nobel laureate.

He started his work on manipulation of microparticles with laser light in the late 1960s which resulted in the invention of optical tweezers in 1986. Optical tweezers can grab particles, atoms, viruses and other living cells with their laser beam fingers and have resulted in the invention of advanced precision instruments used in corrective eye surgery and in industry.

Ashkin won one half of the $1 million prize, with Gerard Mourou of France and Donna Strickland of Canada sharing the other half for together developing a method to generate ultra-short optical pulses, which also is used in corrective eye surgery.


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